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NEW CASE OF COVID-19 CONFIRMED – BUT WE ARE A LONG WAY OFF LOCAL LOCKDOWN – Island Echo

Another new confirmed case of COVID-19 has been identified on the Isle of Wight – but it’s only the 2nd new case since 14th June and the 5th this month.

The total number of cases of coronavirus locally now sits at 204 – a rise of just 1 from 203. Since the…

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Two Kent A&E’s ‘require improvement’ – Kent Online

Two Kent hospitals have been told that their A&E departments require improvement.

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Two of Kent’s biggest hospitals have been told their emergency departments still require improvement after their latest inspections.
Both the William Harvey Hospital in Ashford and Margate’s Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Hospital (QEQM) were given the rating by the CQC following their inspection in March.
Ashford William Harvey Hospital’s A&E. Picture: Paul Amos
However, inspectors said that there were improvements in some areas of the hospitals, both of which are run by the East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust, since their last inspection in 2018.
Both hospitals were rated ‘Good’ for being caring, while QEQM also achieved that rating for being well led.
CQC’s Deputy Chief Inspector of Hospitals, Dr Nigel Acheson, said that leadership was one of “a number of improvements” at the Margate hospital.
He said: “Staff at QEQM understood the services vision and values, and how to apply them in their work.
“They felt respected and valued and were focused on the needs of patients receiving care and were committed to improving services continually.
There have been signs of improvement at the QEQM
“The service was engaging well with patients and the community to plan and manage services.”
The inspection, which was carried out just before routine ones were suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic, also found that mental health support in both services had improved, as had paediatric emergency department services.
However, both hospitals are still rated as ‘Requires Improvement’ for being safe, effective and responsive, while the William Harvey also requires improvement for leadership.
Dr Acheson said: “At William Harvey Hospital our main concerns surrounded staffing and safety in the department.
“Despite staff treating patients with compassion we found that there were not always enough qualified staff on duty, this had an impact on the quality and safety of care of patients within in the department.
“We fully accept that we still have a lot of work to do”
“People could not always access the service when they needed it and did sometimes have to wait too long for treatment. Staff did not always provide patients with pain relief when they needed it.
The East Kent Hospitals trust says that it has taken immediate action to address issues raised in the report, including creating more space in the department, continuing to recruit more nurses, and ensuring risk assessments are consistently carried out.
East Kent Hospitals chief executive Susan Acott said: Staff in the emergency department have worked hard to improve, particularly on the issues raised by the CQC in its 2018 inspection around the privacy and dignity of patients in the department, and compassion.
We fully accept that we still have a lot of work to do to achieve the consistently high standards we want for all our patients in this very complex service.
We recognise the improvements the CQC requires us to make, and we will continue to implement changes to the emergency department to enable staff to provide the highest standards of care.
To keep up-to-date with all the latest developments with your local hospitals and other health stories, click here.
Read more: All the latest news from Kent

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Man, 37, dies from coronavirus after dismissing pandemic as ‘hype’ on Facebook – Mirror Online

US Army veteran Richard Rose had repeatedly criticised all the “s**t about COVID” and tagged himself at crowded venues before contracting the bug and dying days later

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A US Army veteran who dismissed the pandemic as “hype” and refused to wear a face mask has died from coronavirus.
Richard Rose, of Port Clinton, Ohio, died at his home on July 4, just three days after testing positive for the killer bug and going into quarantine.
The 37-year-old had been openly sceptical about the risks of Covid-19, writing in a post on April 28 “I’m not buying a f***ing mask” and “I’ve made it this far by not buying into that damn hype”.
In another, he wrote: “Ive gotten sick of turning my tv on to political smear ads and s**t about COVID.
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The Army veteran described himself as “very sick” before doctors confirmed he had the disease (Image: Facebook)
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“So yesterday I turned my cable box in. Ive also started snoozing people on here. Its time to block out negativity.”
Mr Rose, who served in the military for nine years and did two tours of Iraq and Afghanistan, had also checked in on the social media site at crowded venues.
However, on July 2, just a day after testing positive, his last post said he had no idea where he contracted the disease, adding this covid sh*t sucks! Im so out of breath just sitting here.
He had tagged himself in crowded venues on Facebook and repeatedly refused to wear a mask (Image: Facebook)
In a previous post he suggested contracting the disease had hampered him in starting a new job.
Following his death, a tweet containing a collection of his posts has been viewed 3.5  million times.
In other posts, Mr Rose had also dismissed the Black Lives Matter protests in the wake of George Floyd’s death on May 25 as a “joke”, and had used #BacktheBlue and #ThinBlueLine in posts to show support for the police.
A montage of his posts has gone viral on Twitter after his death (Image: Facebook)
He had dismissed the pandemic as ‘hype’ and said he wouldn’t buy a mask (Image: Facebook)
On May 28, he wrote that he was “in no way racist” and that he supported peaceful protests but that looting and violence during demonstrations tainted the overall message, labelling BLM members as “SELFISH”.
Mr Rose also showed support for Donald Trump’s push to be re-elected in November, posting “Trump 2020” and “I’m glad to call him MY PRESIDENT”, while criticising the media, Islam and the idea of gender as non-binary.
Friend Nick Conley told local media: “Its horrible that we lost Rick but the even more tragic part of that is who else became infected because of the actions that he chose.”
But he added: “Rick is getting slaughtered online right now for his decision that he made not to wear a mask and that’s not right.”
In a tribute piece, his family said his passions included social media, online streaming, paranormal and his two cats Dale and Tucker. 
Officials in his home state had been at the forefront of tackling the pandemic.
Governor Mike DeWine put Ohio into lockdown before any cases had even been reported.
The state has now, however, reported more than 65,000 confirmed cases with at least 3,058 deaths, with a single-day record of 1,525 new cases on Friday.

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Boy, 15, dies of Black Death bug in Mongolia after eating marmot meat with two pals – The Sun

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A 15-YEAR-OLD boy has died from bubonic plague in Mongolia after eating marmot meat with two friends.
The fatality comes as Russia and China were warned that they are vulnerable to the spread of the Black Death.
Two cases of Bubonic plague have been confirmed in the province of KhovdCredit: National Center for Zoonotic Diseases
The teenager and his friends had eaten marmot meatCredit: MongolTV
The unnamed teenager had a high fever after eating marmot meat with two friends.
He died three days after eating the rodent meat, according to reports.
His contacts have all been notified to halt the risk of the disease spreading, with dozens of people who were in contact with him now in isolation.
The bubonic plague is a bacterial disease spread by fleas living on wild rodents like marmots.
BACTERIAL DISEASE
It has a high fatality rate if not treated promptly.
The boy died in the western Mongolian province of Govi-Altai, the country’s National Centre for Zoonotic Diseases (NCZD) said.
A lockdown has been imposed in five districts to stop the spread.
Two cases of bubonic plague were recently confirmed in the neighbouring province of Khovd, a 27-year-old man and his 17-year-old brother.
Epidemiologist are working at a district in Mongolia, gathering samples for researching the diseaseCredit: National Center for Zoonotic Desease
Hundreds of people were vaccinated after coming into direct or indirect contact with the brothers.
A couple died of bubonic plague in the western Mongolian province of Bayan-Ulgii in April 2019, after eating raw marmot meat.
A confirmed case in China this month has not led to any spread, it is believed.
VERY TOXIC
But the Mongolian health ministry admitted that the mountainous Altai regions of China and Russia as well as Mongolia are at risk of the plague due to infected marmots, based on a new study.
A TV broadcast acknowledged these were highly active areas of marmot epidemics.
It was very important not to hunt marmots or eat the meat, said senior official Dorj Narangerel.
Several areas in Mongolia have been quarantinedCredit: National Center for Zoonotic Desease
Dorj Narangerel, head of the Emergency Management Department of the Ministry of Health, has warned people about the diseaseCredit: National Center for Zoonotic Desease
The marmot plague is very toxic.
We urge you to pay special attention to the fact that the pulmonary form of the disease is just as rapid as the coronavirus infection – but it is a disease that can kill people very quickly.
Bubonic plague was responsible for one of the deadliest epidemics in human history – the Black Death – which killed about 50 million people across Africa, Asia and Europe in the 14th century.
Nowadays, it can be treated by antibiotics.
However, if left untreated, the disease – which is typically transmitted from animals to humans by fleas – has a 30-60 per cent fatality rate.
The World Health Organization says it is “carefully monitoring” a case of bubonic plague in the Mongolia region, but says that it is “not high risk”.
Spokeswoman Margaret Harris said: “Bubonic plague has been with us and is always with us, for centuries. We are looking at the case numbers in China. It’s being well managed.
“At the moment, we are not considering it high risk but we’re watching it, monitoring it carefully.”
A TV broadcast acknowledged these were ‘highly active areas of marmot epidemics’Credit: MongolTV

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