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Gary Neville hails Jurgen Klopp’s transformation of Liverpool into Premier League champions – Daily Mail

Liverpool claimed the title for the first time in 30 years, seeing off the competition with seven games to go. Gary Neville praised Jurgen Klopp for his ability to transform Liverpool into champions.

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‘Better for Her Majesty not to know’: palace letters reveal Queen’s role in sacking of Australian PM Whitlam – The Guardian

Governor general John Kerr canvassed Queen and her personal secretary about his powers to dismiss Gough Whitlam but did not forewarn them

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Secret correspondence between Buckingham Palace and the governor general of Australia reveal discussion of a last resort option to dismiss then prime minister Gough Whitlam, but the final decision on the sacking was kept from the Queen as it was better for Her Majesty not to know in advance.
The historic trove of letters between the Queen, her representatives, and then governor general John Kerr in the lead-up to Whitlams dismissal clearly shows the extent to which the palace was drawn into Kerrs 1975 plans to remove the Labor leader from office.
The 211 letters, dubbed the palace letters, were finally released on Tuesday, after a four-year court battle launched by historian Jenny Hocking to remove one of the final veils of secrecy still shrouding one of Australias greatest political crises.
The documents show Kerr clearly canvassed his powers to sack Whitlam with the palace, through the Queens private secretary, Martin Charteris.
On 4 November 1975, a week out from the dismissal, Charteris told Kerr that he was playing the vice-regal hand with skill and wisdom.
Your interest in the situation has been demonstrated and so has your impartiality, Charteris wrote.
He said the fact that Kerr had the powers to dissolve parliament is recognised but it is also clear that you will only use them in the last resort and then only for Constitutional and not for political reasons.
To use them is a heavy responsibility and it is only at the very end when there is demonstrably no other course that they should be used, he wrote.
Charteris also cautioned Kerr that Fraser wanted him to believe that the country was in a constitutional crisis, because he believed he would win the ensuing election.
On the day of Whitlams dismissal, 11 November 1975, Kerr wrote to the palace. He made it clear that he had not informed the palace directly of his decision.
He did so to protect the Queen.
I should say I decided to take the step I took without informing the palace in advance because, under the Constitution, the responsibility is mine, and I was of the opinion it was better for Her Majesty not to know in advance, though it is, of course, my duty to tell her immediately, Kerr wrote.
Charteris later responded:
If I may say so with the greatest respect, I believe in not informing the Queen of what you intended to do before doing it, you acted not only with Constitutional propriety, but also with admirable consideration for Her Majestys position.
The letters also further confirm that, in the lead-up to the dismissal, Kerr feared Whitlam may try to have him sacked as governor-general.
That may explain why Kerr did not give advance warning to Whitlam of his intentions.
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In 1975 the Australian government led by Gough Whitlam was sensationally sacked by the governor general, Sir John Kerr, the Queens representative in Australia. The palace letters are hundreds of previously secret letters between Kerr and the Queen about the dismissal. Many believe they hold the key to understanding what role the Queen played in Whitlams downfall.
Many Australians think they alone have the ability to vote governments in and out but, under the countrys constitution and because Australia is not a republic, ultimate power rests with the governor general as a representative of the Queen. Kerrs move to force Whitlams reforming leftwing government from office, after the conservative opposition had blocked appropriation bills in the upper house of parliament, remains one of the most controversial moments in modern Australian politics.
Well may we say God save the Queen because nothing will save the governor general. Gough Whitlam, 11 November, 1975.
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Writing on 20 November 1975, Kerr explained to the palace that he had not wanted to put the Queen in a difficult position.
History will doubtless provide an answer to this question, but I was in a position where, in my opinion, I simply could not risk the outcome for the sake of the monarchy, he wrote.
If, in the period of say 24 hours, during which he

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Coronavirus: UK charities launch appeal to help world’s most vulnerable countries – BBC News

Fourteen charities – including Oxfam and the British Red Cross – are asking the public to donate.

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An appeal to help the world’s most vulnerable through the coronavirus pandemic has been launched by the UK’s Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC).
Fourteen charities – including Oxfam, Christian Aid, Islamic Relief and the British Red Cross – will join together to ask the British public to donate.
The UK government will double the first £5m of donations.
Much of the money will go to refugee camps, where overcrowding and poor sanitation allows the virus to spread.
The DEC, which is made up of 14 of Britain’s largest aid charities, will spend donations on providing food, water and medical care to people in countries such as Syria, Yemen and South Sudan.
Other target countries are Somalia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Afghanistan and the Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh.
The DEC estimates there are 24 million internally-displaced people in these countries. A further 850,000 Rohingya people have fled violence to live in Bangladesh’s camps.
Donations will also be spent on providing soap to vulnerable families and on providing information about the dangers of the spread of the disease.
Countries seeing a rise in daily deaths
While the UK and much of Europe appears to have passed its peak for deaths of people with coronavirus, there are many countries around the world currently seeing a rise, many of them in more vulnerable parts of the world. These include:

  • Argentina
  • Bolivia
  • Colombia
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Panama
  • Philippines
  • Venezuela

International Development Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan said: “Clean water and healthcare in refugee camps are essential in containing coronavirus in the developing world – helping stop the spread of the pandemic and protecting the UK from further waves of infection.”
So far, £769m in UK aid has been pledged globally to fight the pandemic, according to the Department for International Development.
Image copyrightPA MediaImage caption
International Development Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan said the UK government will double the first £5m of donations
Broadcasters including the BBC will show the DEC fundraising appeals on Tuesday.
DEC chief executive Saleh Saeed said: “For those fleeing violence and conflict in the world’s most fragile places, the pandemic is a new battle that they are not equipped to fight.
“These families have already lived through trauma and upheaval.
“Many are now living in crowded refugee and displacement camps with little access to medical care, clean water or enough food – the bare essentials they need to survive the crisis.
“Millions of lives are at stake. We are urging people to donate now.”
Image copyrightDEC
What is the DEC?

  • The committee brings together 14 UK charities to provide and deliver aid to ensure successful appeals
  • The charities include Oxfam, Save the Children UK, Age International, British Red Cross, Cafod, Christian Aid and Islamic Relief
  • Its website provides more details of its coronavirus appeal and its other current appeals

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Roger Stone speaks in Fox News interview after Trump commutation – The Guardian

Donald Trump’s longtime confidant repeatedly thanked the president while calling the Mueller investigation ‘a goose egg’

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Donald Trumps longtime confidant Roger Stone gushed over his political allies during an interview on Fox News on Monday, his first major television appearance since the president commuted Stones prison sentence on Friday.
Stone had been convicted of seven felony counts including obstruction of justice, lying to Congress and witness tampering in the congressional investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and was sentenced to more than three years in jail. The president, in defending his commutation, said Stone was treated very unfairly.
The commutation was met with widespread criticism from Democrats and several Republicans, including Pennsylvania senator Pat Toomey and Utah senator Mitt Romney, who called it an act of historic corruption.
Stone appeared on the Monday night interview show with Fox Newss Sean Hannity alongside his lawyer, David Schoen. I have deep, deep affection for Donald Trump because Ive known him for 40 years, Stone said. Hes a man of great justice and fairness, hes a man of enormous courage He saved my life. And, at least on paper, he gave me a chance to fight for vindication.
On Saturday, special counsel Robert Mueller spoke out publicly for the first time in a year to defend his investigation against criticism from Trump and his supporters.
We did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired with the Russian government in its activities, Mueller wrote. The investigation did, however, establish that the Russian government perceived it would benefit from a Trump presidency and worked to secure that outcome. It also established that the campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts.
Stone has consistently denied any wrongdoing and argued that the investigation was a sham.
I had a biased judge, I had a stacked jury, I had a corrupt jury forewoman, Stone said, going on to thank Hannity and a host of public conservative figures including General Mike Flynn and Tucker Carlson. And also Congressman Matt Gaetz from Florida who I hope to live long enough to live in the White House.
Stone used his interview with Hannity to argue that the prison sentence would have effectively been a death sentence because of his ongoing asthma and the multiple inmates with Covid-19 cases.
Im 67 years old, Ive had lifelong respiratory problems, Stone said.
At another point in the interview, Stone said prosecutors wanted to use Stone to fuel an impeachment effort against the president.
They wanted me to be the ham in their ham sandwich because they knew the Mueller report, particularly on Russia, it was a dud. It was a goose egg, Stone said.
The Mueller report did not conclude that Trump directly coordinated with Russia or obstructed justice but it did not absolve him completely. The report did, however, argue that Trump may have played a role in Russias effort to interfere in the 2016 election. Nevertheless, Trump himself has argued that the fact that the report did not completely implicate him means he is innocent and the investigation is just an effort to undermine his presidency. Mueller himself has pushed back on that and noted that Trump could be charged after he left office.
Schoen spoke only briefly during the interview and, like his client, thanked Trump.
This commutation was a great tribute to President Trump, Schoen said, saying the president was sending the message that the Mueller team was rotten to the core. The president saved a life here.
Trump called Stone on Friday after commuting his sentence, a call Stone told ABC News was a normal conversation and brief.
Stone, a longtime friend and former campaign adviser to the president, was due to begin his sentence this week. The commutation does not erase Stones felony convictions but allows Stone to avoid setting foot in prison for his crimes.

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